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Let’s raise multilingual and multitalented children together Here you will find information about how I raise multilingual and multitalented kids. From OPOL (One-Person-One-Language) to CLAP (Contextual Language Acquisition Philosophy) to other types of context optimization, my methods focus on the living environment in order for children to easily and naturally develop languages and other talents. Find out how you can also create the best context for your children to develop the necessary skills for tomorrow’s challenges

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Let’s raise multilingual and multitalented children together

Here you will find information about how I raise multilingual and multitalented kids. From OPOL (One-Person-One-Language) to CLAP (Contextual Language Acquisition Philosophy) to other types of context optimization, my methods focus on the living environment in order for children to easily and naturally develop languages and other talents. Find out how you can also create the best context for your children to develop the necessary skills for tomorrow’s challenges

Who Is Tetsu Yung?

Raising kids is hard. And raising them in a multilingual environment is even harder. That’s why Testu Yung is an inspiration to me. He serves as a role model for parents like myself who are raising their children in a multilingual environment. This piece will highlight his awesome impact on language-learning and why anyone who’s interested in learning languages needs to know who Tetsu Yung is.

Born in Hong Kong to a multilingual family, he has a true understanding of what it means to be a global citizen. Tetsu spent his childhood in Taiwan, where he learned to speak Mandarin from his father and his family, Japanese from his mother and her family, and English from attending an American school. He would also learn some Taiwanese and a local dialect, Hakka.

But his exposure to language wouldn’t end there. He eventually went to high school in Quebec where he learned French. And after a time there, he joined his friend on an exchange trip to Ecuador where he picked up Spanish.

It was this background in language-learning as a child raised in a multilingual family combined with a genuine interest in language-learning that led him to understand the value of a multilingual upbringing. Inspired to help others raise their children in a multilingual environment, he would write, Pampers to Polyglots: 7 Ideas for Raising Multilingual Kids Like Me in 2015.

Today, he speaks English, French, Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish. He also organizes LangFest, an international event that gathers together polyglots and language enthusiasts from around the world to share their stories, insights, and passions for language learning. And now as a father himself, Tetsu lives what he practices, raising his kids in a multilingual environment to better prepare them for lives as global citizens.

What Is LangFest?

Tetsu is the founder and host of LangFest, a week-long, annual event held every August in Montreal, Quebec. During the event, language enthusiasts come together to hear entrepreneurs, educators, language gurus, and industry professionals talk about linguistics and language learning. The event typically covers everything from tools to techniques, sharing the gift of how to learn and use new languages.

It’s the perfect environment for anyone to share the languages they’re learning and the ones they love. The event caters to second and third language learners as well as many well-known polyglots. You can find major world languages like Spanish, French, Russian, Chinese, and other, smaller languages like Gaelic, Cree, and others.

The event serves as a yearly opportunity to immerse yourself in languages with activities like talks, tours, and other social events. Language-learners from far and wide are invited to check it out and share their experiences while forming new, international friends to keep the conversations going.

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